Recent Posts

Blog

English

Spell (Inktober 2018 – Day Four)

 

I know, there aren’t really any rules to Inktober, but still, it’s called Inktober, so the only rule is that the drawings should involve ink. If I understood correctly, Jake Parker, the guy who started the challenge is an inker and his reasoning behind the whole thing is to promote inking.

And that’s where things get complicated for me.

See, there are some drawings I make that I find almost decent on pencil, but once inked, it’s a completely different story. It’s the main reason why yesterday’s entry lacks details for example. And today, I had another problem.

Once again, I did two versions of the same drawing – today’s prompt is spell – but I liked the first one much better originally, when it was on pencil only. Except that I messed up the inking. I wasn’t too sure how to do the stripes on the bee’s abdomen, and I tried my grey pen. Big mistake (not mentioning the leg that became too big). Only with the second drawing, I found a satisfying way to do the stripes, except that I don’t like the second drawing that much.

And of course, I didn’t take a picture of the pencil-only drawings this time.

Oh well, I guess that’s part of the learning process.

 

 

 

 

English

Roasted (Inktober 2018 – Day Three)

 

This one is pretty straightforward. Of course my first thought hearing the word “roasted” was a chicken (gosh, I miss roasted chicken so bad), but as “chicken” is actually the keyword for Day five of this year’s Inktober, I had to think of something else.

There is only one attempt, not for lack of trying to draw a second one.

 

English

Tranquil (Inktober 2018 – Day Two)

 

For this second day of Inktober 2018, the keyword is “tranquil.” This is the first thing that came to mind. As this time, I drew from scratch and not from a picture, there’s a noticeable drop in quality.

Once again, two different attempts. I like the first one better.

 

 

On a side note, I think I’ll stop looking at what other people do – which is the shame, I think that’s the most interesting thing about Inktober, to see how the same single word inspire people differently all over the world. The discrepancy between what most people taking part in this thing can do and what I can do is just too big and depressing.

The whole point of this thing is to not be depressed anymore about my drawing skills or lack thereof, so I’m afraid that could be counterproductive.

 

 

English

Poisonous (Inktober 2018 – Day One)

 

So, here we go, let’s start with the first word of this 2018 edition of Inktober, and it’s:

Poisonous

So, sure, a snake is not the most original thing, but I’m not trying to be original here, I’m trying to find something I can draw for the first day of this whole endeavor.

This is the first one I drew (from a picture):

 

But here is the thing, I had picked a nice notebook to make my drawings, but after a few days, I realized that the paper was a bit too thin for subsequent inking, so I redid a few of them (the ones I could reproduce basically) on thicker paper.

Version two of the drawing:

Those are with with pencil, as it’s called Inktober, there must be some ink involved in the process at some point, right?

So here are the same two drawings, but inked:

 

 

 

I find it interesting that with the pencil only versions, I like the first one better, but once inked, I like the second one better.

Overall, I’m somewhat satisfied with these drawings. The heads aren’t too bad, but as far as the body is concerned, that’s another story.

 

See you tomorrow with “Tranquil

 

Edito

I can’t draw, so I’m joining Inktober!

I hate Inktober!

Every year, in October, all my social media timelines get covered with amazing drawings about all sorts of topics, and every single one of them is like a little dart piercing my heart and reminding me that I suck at drawing.

It could not be a big deal. Not being able to draw is not a big deal for many people. Also, there are many other things I can’t do, and when I see people doing them well, it doesn’t affect me one bit.
So, what is it with drawing in particular that makes me feel this particular way (let’s name the feeling, it’s jealousy, basically – sadness too)?

Well, we need to go back in time to my childhood in order to understand.

See, as a kid, I used to love drawing. I did it a lot. I was an “indoor” kid and two of my favorite hobbies were reading and drawing.
I loved drawing!
I did it a lot, and I was pretty good at it, much better than many other kids my age. Sure, I never imagined myself having some sort of artistic career. I kinda knew early on that being an artist as a job wasn’t for me. A social environment thing probably, while growing up in a lower middle-class family, my parents themselves were from a rural and a working class background respectively. In other words, culture and art weren’t too common in the household, or only the super mainstream thing. In other words, as far as culture and art are concerned, I’m pretty much an autodidact.

But, I’m starting to digress. My point is that, as a kid, I used to love drawing, without anything to push me or help me with it. It’s just something I did.

However, around age 10, something happened! My drawing skills just stopped improving.
I went from being a pretty good “artist” at age 10 to being a quite bad one at age 15, my style and my skills not having evolved nor improved a single bit. Things got worse as I moved on to high school, although, at this point I had stopped trying. I still loved drawing, but really I had given up, I was just tracing in order to reproduce drawings I liked when stumbling upon them.

I tried to draw again at age 20. I could reproduce (without tracing this time) some drawings fine, but I was totally unable to create anything from scratch.
I tried a few techniques to go around that problem (like turning pictures into drawings, using tracing and such) but little by little the frustration of not being able to create what I wanted became too strong and I pretty much gave up drawing for good, especially because around the same time, I realized that I wasn’t as bad as I thought with writing, and I forked towards practicing that artistic skill instead.

Fast forward about 20 years, and Inktober 2018 is around the corner and a friend posts the official list on her Facebook page, and for some reason, stumbling upon it, all my frustrations of being a failed drawing artist resurfaced.

I had a small conversation about that with said friend, and she told me that her story with drawing wasn’t too different from mine, but for the past few years, she has practiced and practiced. Of course, she told me that she was still bad, and I know she isn’t, although she says that she has the same issue as I have: she can reproduce, but create not so much. I don’t know if she’s being humble or not.

In any case, she told me that instead of being frustrated with Inktober, why don’t I embrace it and use it as a way to practice, and simply try.

For some reason it resonated in me and she convinced me to do it.

It’s kind of a crazy idea, throwing myself out in the world with that hashtag next to my terrible drawings. Am I going to be mocked? Ridiculed? Or most likely, my drawings will be met with uneasy silence with people thinking “What the f*** is he doing? This is embarrassing!”

Well, we’ll see, because I’m doing it!

I started to make some drawings in advance, I’m not sure if I can draw one thing a day for a month, some I don’t hate, some that are indeed embarrassing, and I’ll post them on my blog every day (or almost every day). I’m not sure if I’ll have the courage to post them on Instagram, Twitter and such, we’ll see.

When you see my drawings, please don’t lie and tell me that they’re great when they’re not. However, don’t tell me that they suck either, I know they do. I’m kinda doing this for myself. Not trying to become a professional artist, here. I4m not even trying to get likes on social media. I’m a little bit like the fat kid who one day starts running. He knows he will never make it to the Olympics and that’s not his goal. He’s doing it for himself. To feel better about himself, maybe healthier, or to – you know – just do it.

And you know what? Since I started drawing those little doodles a few days ago, I noticed something. They’re a great stress reliever, probably the most efficient one I’ve tried recently. So, if only for that, I think I’ll try to finish this Inktober thing, and who knows, maybe keep on drawing into November and beyond!

Oh and by the way, here is the list of themes/prompts for this year:

 

 

Edito

François Corbier

 

François Corbier, je t’aimais bien à l’époque de Récré A2. J’avais même pas 10 ans, tu étais ce grand fou chantant en salopette bleu-blanc-rouge. J’étais un poil trop vieux pour le Club Dorothée qui n’était plus ma tasse de thé.

Plus tard, je te croisais parfois dans les pages de Fluide Glacial chez mon pote Thomas, mais je t’ai vraiment redécouvert il y a une quinzaine d’années, quand l’ami Fred m’a parlé de ton blog. Je suis devenu fan et lecteur assidu. À la suite de certains posts, nous avons eu plusieurs fois de chouettes discussions par e-mail. Je me souviens encore de quand nous comparions nos notes à propos des commerçants de Rocamadour où tu te produisais de temps à autres et où tu étais passé juste avant l’une de mes visites de cette ville qui j’aime tant : “celui-là, c’est un chouette type, parle-pas à celui-ci, c’est un con, etc.”

Read more “François Corbier”

Parenting

What watching Kira Kira Precure À La Mode for…

Spoilers: A life-changing experience it was not, but it was interesting and worth it for other reasons.

I guess I need to start this article by telling you what Precure is exactly.
So, Precure is a Japanese anime that celebrates its 15th birthday this year and that’s extremely popular in Japan among a very specific demographic.
The terme Precure is a portmanteau word formed by combining Pretty and Cure (sometimes, you can see Pretty Cure instead of Precure in some merchandising materials). And in Japanese, it’s pronounced [Pulikyua], even though I always say “Pellicula” and I usually get away with it.

Read more “What watching Kira Kira Precure À La Mode for one year with my five year old daughter taught me.”